Sunday, July 26, 2015

Remembering

This is Sunday morning. I peddled my bike to the nearby Jewish Deli, DZ Akins. I had a yearning for Knackwurst and eggs. And DZ Akins is the only nearby place where this item is on the menu.

I brought my MacBook Air computer with me so that I could watch the movie, "Fiddler On The Roof" during my breakfast.  This "Fiddler" story is similar to the story of my own family. My family all came from the same part of Russia as in this story. My family members were all hounded the same as the "Fiddler's" family.

There is no reason why my family members back in those long ago times of the early 1900s were hounded. Their homes burned down. People beaten up. That was the way it was. And if the truth were known, that may be the way it is today. Maybe not everywhere today. But in lots of places.

I came to DZ Akins so that I might be able to get closer to my family members now departed. To remember the stories my grandfather told me about his times as a young boy and young man. How he made the decision to leave Russia and make a new home in America. My grandfather went ahead of his wife and baby boy, and walked hundreds of miles to the Port of Bremen in Germany where he boarded a ship to New York City.

From New York City he made his way to Cleveland, Ohio where a few family members of mine had emigrated. There he found employment as a blacksmith. About a year later, my grandmother made the crossing with her young son and new baby daughter [my mother].

It's very important for me to think of these things. To remember our family history so that it will not be forgotten.

10 comments:

  1. You are right George it is still going on. Just look at what is going on in the Middle East today. People are dying because of their religious affiliation or ethnic background. Things aren't much better in some parts of the USofA, either. Sad, because we all put our pants on, one leg at a time.

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  2. Every family has a story and it is equally important to remember what has been going on, which also makes Genealogy a very interesting occupation. I made quite a few discoveries myself that way.

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  3. People forget, or they're unaware, of the reasons their ancestors moved to America (or Canada or Australia or etc.) and that was to get a better life. They may have left because of wars, religious persecutions, poverty or just a simple "no future". In most cases they were welcomed by their new country's government as they brought something their new country welcomed.

    Today I am shocked by how unwelcoming our new countries have become. For example, people want to vacation and party in third world countries but they would not welcome these people as Neighbours or even immigrants. Rather than find solutions for the world, governments have become more punishing and restrictive, putting up walls or walls of regulations.

    How many of us, children of immigrants, would be welcomed today in the countries we grew up in.

    I see the faults from history coming back... like militarism, elitism, jingoism, racism, blame. Appalling and there's no escape, where can you move to?

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  4. Cheers to you George re biking and carrying your laptop. I will be 77 Aug 1 and try to bike 7 miles at least 4 times a week. Printed some maintenance pages from your archive for a new rver who bought a 1990 Tioga type class C. Realized again how much you traveled and how much joy you brought to so many of us. I turned over 100k in my Monaco coming up from FL. Thanks again for your great blog. Best to you.

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  5. George,
    Thank you for sharing this story of your family. I am always happy to see you post a new entry and now that reminds me to update my blog too.
    Paul aka NomadPaul

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  6. I enjoyed reading the story of your family and also the story of your travels. take care

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  7. George,
    How nice you posted your thoughts about your family. The story is so much like my grandparents that immigrated from a small mountain town in southern Italy. My grandfather came first and had to leave his wife and daughter behind for two years before they were allowed to immigrate to the US. It was a hard life and saying goodbye to family they would never see again. I consider myself the product of their dreams.

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  8. Hi George,
    I discovered your blog archive a couple weeks ago and I am going through it. I am on Friday Dec 19, 2003. It's the day you were working on your Bi-Polar page. I am noting your boondocking locations on a google map and am taking in your sage boondocking methods! It's great stuff and I am really enjoying reading everything. You are fantastic. Thanks so much for your attention to detail and entertaining writing. I am very excited to continue your journey with your. -Greg (Sockmonkeytrekkers.blogspot.com)

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  9. George, have you thought about how to keep the blog going for many years to come so that future reads can benefit from your accumulated knowledge and stories? It would be a terrible thing for this wonderful resource to up and disappear one day!!!!! Thanks!

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  10. Hi Greg,
    Yes, I have thought about that. It would require a "digital asset" executor. I do not know if such an entity exists!

    This executor would have to given cash to pay the various charges that a website receives.

    George

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