Friday, January 13, 2017

Storage2



Tweaking New Storage Cabinets


6am - After breakfast, we are returning to The Home Depot. The new storage cabinets need a little tweaking.

Driving from WalMart to 24 Hour Fitness yesterday, showed that the cabinets moved around and the drawers opened. We are buying some 1/2" plywood that will be used to secure the cabinets. And bungee cord to keep the drawers closed.

While at The Home Depot, we also need some other stuff:
  • Black paint for Scampy's propane tie-downs which are rusting.
  • A very small brush to paint both the propane tank tie-downs and the blocks that were added to the stove top. *
  • Bondo body filler. **
* Remember the video that I promised for Scampy's stove top rework? All that is needed to finish that rework is painting the blocks that keep that stove top from moving.

** Remember the accident that happened when I jack-knifed Scampy? The Bondo is needed to finish the bumper repair job. 


7:30am - Cop knocks
Last nite around 3am, there was a knock on MsScampy's door. It was a cop. He told me that somebody from the shopping center had phoned.

I'd have to leave or I might be arrested and charged with trespassing. Then, he had an after-thought. "You should go to WalMart. They are more tolerant."

That reminded me of my first time Camping in the City of Guaymas, Mexico. I picked a road that had a nice view. Then, went across the street to the nearest house and asked the lady who lived there for permission to remain for the nite.

She replied, "This is Mexico. Here you do not need to ask permission. You are welcome to stay."

Americans believe that they are very friendly people. But! Americans are definitely NOT a friendly people. In fact, Americans do not have a clue what being friendly is.

But the Mexicans know: "Bien venidos amigos!" That means "Welcome friends!" A motto if the Mexican people.

Note: In 2010, I travelled to Israel. Part of the reason for that trip was to choose a country to live in. United States, Israel or Mexico?

What I learned shocked me! Being a Jew, I leaned toward Israel. After spending several weeks in Jerusalem, I found that the people there were not friendly. In fact, the people of Israel and the United States are equally unfriendly!

Guess what? Mexico won! Hands-down! When walking down a street in Mexico and meeting a stranger and saying, "Buenos dias" the stranger would usually stop and engage me in conversation which most often would continue for a half hour or more.

Do the same in Israel or the United States, and the stranger would look at you with a questioning look. As if to say, "I don't know you!" And if they answered with a "Good morning", they would not even slow down. Sort of an over-the-shoulder, "Good morning" and then continue on their way.

The awesome friendliness of the Mexican people is the only reason that I returned to Mexico that year and lived there for seven years.



.

25 comments:

  1. I agree. Why not return to Mexico for a while?
    Any country that would elect Trump as President is giving the world notice about themselves - BUG OFF !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. About us, gotta agree with you on that one!

      Delete
    2. Hi my dear friend Juanito,

      Are you letting out your steam about Trump being elected on me?

      Why are you suggesting that I return to Mexico?

      You know, I am sure, that I returned from Mexico for two reasons. The murder of two of my friends. And my poor health.

      George


      .

      Delete
  2. George, you have just described to me two entirely different situations. 1) you followed the right protocol in Mexico and covered your butt when you crossed the road to ask the Senora if you may be her guest and park for the night on her property (which may or may not have been a public right of way). Believe me, your stature was elevated in her eyes for doing so; her words were just part of her unassuming nature, and she was being nice. 2) heck, I did not know that parking lots around shopping centers were private property; I've always thought that these lots were part of the infrastructure built by the local government to draw these shopping centers into the towns. Maybe you thought so, too. It's just like my Mother used to say to me when I "assumed" anything. Dee, do you know what the first three letters of "assume" spells? I guess when you use 24 Hour Fitness as a customer and park, that is a totally different situation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most, if not all, shopping center parking lots are included in the deed legally assigned to the developer/owner of the shopping center. Therefore, the property is considered to be 'private property'.

      Delete
    2. Hi Dee,

      Thank you very much for commenting your thinking the Nite Camping issue that I wrote about in my Blog.

      Tioga George

      .

      Delete
  3. George, been to Israel and Mexico and of course US. I could not agree more with your observations. I find I feel the way you do about many issues in this life. I often recite the serenity prayer to myself. Keep working on those projects. What will you do about the shower pump damage? I agree that shower water on the ground is no problem but other folks may not agree.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow! Jack!!

      You and I have both travelled in Israel. Not many people have! Jerusalem is such a fascinating place.

      Thru thousands of years of history, many Biblical persons have walked the streets of Jerusalem [King Solomon. King David. Jesus]. And visitors to Jerusalem are able to walk those same streets, following their footsteps. Amazing!

      I've cut off the plastic tubes below the shower. Repair of Scampy's floor is well on it's way. I'll Blog about that soon.

      Tioga George


      .

      Delete
  4. George, I've been a long time reader, since the beginning, but commented only on one other occasion. I find I have to comment on your criticism of American friendliness.

    I'm a Canadian who spends four months a year in Texas and have found Texans to be unfailingly friendly and helpful to this stranger. I have also travelled extensively, by RV, in Mexico and never felt as safe in Mexico as I do in eiher Canada or the US. I also had to be vigilent for scam artists and outright thieves. The average person in Mexico is friendly but many will take advantage if you allow it. Didn't you move away from Mexico because you had been robbed... more than once? Seems to me that personal safety outweighs friendliness. Afterall, maybe the mouse thinks it's very friendly that someone left them a nice fresh piece of cheese.

    As to camping overnight on private property, many shopping malls, Walmarts and such used to allow it but had to stop because people took advantage. I have been inconvenienced myself by this change in Walmart policy but I respect the rights of property owners. I always go inside and check, like you did with the lady in Mexico, before overnighting in someone's parking lot. Did you check with the mall? Did you maybe miss the "no overnight parking" sign or is there a municipal bylaw prohibiting it? If you're going to flout the law/rules you have to be content to accept the consequences with grace not a rant about unfriendly Americans.

    I used to live in a large city that held a two week festival very near my home every year. On street parking was almost non-existant and visitors had to park on the property of the venue and PAY for the privledge. I lost track of the number of times folks parked in front of my home blocking my driveway; a few actually parked in my driveway and two on my front lawn. So I know what it's like when people don't respect my rights as a property owner and I do the same for others. I suspect, if you owned your own home, you'd be just as outraged. Or if you still had your hamburger restaurant and people parked in your parking lot to do business with some other restaurant, would that be OK? I realise you weren't "harming" anyone except that you were violating the rules. "If you can't do the time, don't do the crime", they say.

    Be well and be safe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sandra,

      I disagree with your comment several times:
      * Your example of friendly Texans is very limited. Does your experiences with Texans negate all the I wrote?

      * Your comment about not feeling safe in Mexico is ONLY a feeling.

      Did you actually experience the following in Mexico:
      [1] Being scammed and outright thievery?
      [2] Being taken advantage of by most of the Mexicans you encountered?

      Returning to the USA:
      I moved from Mexico back to the USA because I had health issues.

      Also, two of my close friends were murdered and I was the one who found their bodies. Traumatized me. Murder is a rare event in that Mexican town.

      Flouting laws
      About my flouting laws about Street Camping. What is so wrong about the very few laws that I do not follow?

      Nearly all President's of the United States do the same (Reagan: Iran-Contra).

      Do you yourself obey every law?

      Can't do the time
      Your example of: "If you can't do the time, don't do the crime" does not mean anything. Just a phrase that people use to justify their prejudices against things of which they do not approve.

      Thomas Jefferson quote
      "If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so."

      In the case of my camping on public streets
      What right do the citizens of their city have to demand that their elected representatives pass regulations against my camping on public streets? My streets!

      Minority rights
      Minority rights are protected in the US Constitution against the tyranny of the majority. We now see that tyranny going on daily by persons who have been abused by the majority for being poor and living on the streets.

      I am not poor. But I choose to camp on streets. I am extremely considerate of my neighbors when I do it.

      Tioga George


      .

      Delete
    2. Hi George,
      You say my experiene with friendly Texans is very limited. I would debate your use of "very limited". I'm here four months out of evry year... one third of my life and have been doing this for several years. Before Texas, I traveled to Florida every year for decades and have traveled extensively in the southwest. On top of that, I live right on the border and visit The States on a regular basis. There are few states I have not been to. I believe I have a sufficient sample to form a valid opinion. Of course there's no proving this one way or another.

      As for my feelings, of course they are my feelings, as are yours that Americans are unfriendly or not.

      Now, as for your flouting the law, which is the precipitating discussion, I didn't attribute rightness or wrongness to your lawlessness. I made no moral judgement. I merely stated that if you insist on breaking laws, take your punishment without the ranting... and you weren't camping on a street; you were camping on private property. Both are generally against the rules but let's at least be accurate.

      Regarding Presidential lawbreaking, how do you feel about Bill Clinton's, uhm, rule-breaking and subsequent lying about it? Was that OK too? Is it always excusable for a government leader to ignore the rules?

      I try to obey the law. I haven't deliberately broken a law in many many years.

      The "can't do the time" phrase is spot on for people who push the limits, get hurt/caught then whine about it. It's quite as salutory as "suck it up", in my opinion.

      Thomas Jefferson never said that. No one ever said those exact words but they are similar to a phrase he wrote in the Declaration of Independence "...whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government...," or possibly, Martin Luther King's quote from his letter from Birmingham, "One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws." However, I would hardly dignify your trespass adventure with either of these lofty ideals. (I'm surprised a Canadian has to educate you about Jefferson.)

      As for your camping on public streets, (remember the original post was about camping on private property), the citizens have the absolute right to demand their elected representatives pass regulations against camping on public streets if that is their wish. It's called democracy. It is the responsibility of elected representatives follow the wishes of their constituents... if only they did it more often. Your streets??? Their streets! They live there and pay municipal taxes. You're just passing through.

      You don't seem to get it. By trespassing on private property because you don't want to pay to camp, (you can't even claim need) you are not being considerate. If someone parks their camper in front of my house and trys to stay overnight, they can count on a visit from the local constabulary. I don't care how polite they are.

      Everything else considered, overnight parking on city streets and most private property, is not legal and anyone doing it risks being rousted in the middle of the night. And they asked for it. My opinion.

      Delete
    3. Hi Sandra,

      I'm sorry to let you know that I will not be replying, point for point, to your latest comment.

      My Blog is mostly a peaceful place. Not a debate thing.

      In your future comments here, I will of course reply to you.

      George



      .

      Delete
    4. I guess "friendly" means different things to different people. Several years ago two people were murdered in our neighborhood. Since then, the neighbors have looked out for each other, meaning, in part, that we are very aware of strangers hanging around our neighbor's homes. I'm sure you are aware that burglars often watch their victims' homes to see when they are at home, or when they go to bed for the evening, etc. So, my definition of friendliness means looking out for my family and my neighbors.
      About parking lots, businesses must buy that property and pay to have the parking lot built. It is private property. To minimize break-ins, they must either make it off limits to people spending the night there, or pay for extra security. It may not be friendly, but it is prudent.

      Everyone has their own opinions, and you are certainly entitled to yours. I don't mean to be disrespectful or argumentative. Just stating another point of view

      Delete
    5. Hi Kay,

      Your point-of-view, as I've written about before, is pretty much an American point-of view. It is not a worldwide point-of-view.

      Mexico, is one country whose people have "welcome friends" as their fundamental core value.

      Most Americans, do not even consider "welcome friends" as a diserable value.

      Come to think about it, most Americans do not even understand what a value is!

      .

      Delete
  5. It is tough to generalize about friendlyness but I do think we have a lot of frightened people in this country and the fear is manifested in being rude and not friendly. People are also angry. We have economic system based on tricking people out of their money. Our political system has been broken for thirty years. So no surprise when you run into it. It is all around us. I will say that at an RV Park if you have a problem you will be overwhelmed with people wanting to help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Bob,

      You and I are on exactly the same page, with what you wrote
      in your comment.

      Thank you,
      Tioga George


      .

      Delete
  6. I taught young children for many years. More than once the subject came up about whether this or that behavior was ok. I always said that what we have to ask ourselves is "is it ok for EVERYBODY to do this? " I find that thinking applies in many aspects of our world. Back then, the subject was "running in the halls"' or "stealing from a classmate". I think we must consider whether it would be OK for EVERYBODY to park wherever they want. That philosophy would surely cause problems.
    I, for one, would not appreciate having our neighborhood streets filled with trailers. Yes. Walmart has been friendly to RVers. But, I remember finding a Walmart parking lot so full of fancy class A's that car parking was very limited. With a campground a few blocks away, these people chose to save their money.

    About Mexico. I agree that you can't generalize when it comes to people. Yes, many were friendly. But I also remember SEVERAL times when you were robbed. Starting with in Santa Rosalia. The phone. And, when you left Mexico, it was certainly not just because of a robbery. Of course, people kill here, too. But you went to friends HERE after the nightmare there. I think Bob is right about the anger here. But not fair at all for you to classify us as "unfriendly."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Rose,

      This reply is only addressing your comment about "streets filled with trailers."

      You may "not appreciate" trailers in your neighborhood. With that stated, however, do you agree that the streets are NOT your property?

      George


      .

      Delete
    2. The streets are public property. They were paved with tax payer money. Upkeep is done with local taxpayer money. And therefore local laws control who parks on them. I think your thinking is that as taxpayers, all should have access. But rules have to fit everyone. What one can do, all should be able to do, whether it is parking in parking lots, streets, or wherever.
      My opinion.

      Delete
    3. RunNRose, "I think your thinking is that AS TAXPAYERS,(emphasis added) all should have access." Absolutely and unequivocally yes. Taxpayers purchased the property and maintains the property as a PUBLIC right-of-way.

      If a neighborhood wants the street exclusive to them, they should purchase the street from the government which is operating on behalf of ALL taxpayers, and the neighborhood should maintain and gate that street, just has been done on Hilton Head Island, SC about 100 miles from me. If it is not affordable that a neighborhood is able to do that, then that neighborhood (and that neighborhood only) has just simply a personal problem (which is in no way a problem of all taxpayers).

      Delete
    4. Hi Rose & Dee,

      I'm not being argumentative in my reply. Just an observation.

      Both of you are colored by your exposure to American thinking. And, Americans truly believe that their way is the correct way.

      It is not the correct way. And it is not the incorrect way. Your view, in my opinion, is just the American way.

      And what is, the American way, in the context of our discussion?

      I prefer to answer this question with, what is NOT the American way:
      The American way is NOT, WELCOME FRIENDS, to nearly everybody an American meets.

      George




      .

      Delete
  7. Americans are known for being a "cold" culture. Mexicans will tell you that. Mexicans hug and kiss, even strangers sometimes if not at least a handshake. The distance kept between cultures is interesting. British is an arm-length and a half, Americans one arm length, and Mexicans one foot or less. In Mexico, kids play out in the street, the neighbors know each other well. Mothers sweep in front of their house every morning and are known to gather and chat. Men do the same in the evenings usually with a cold beer. Neighbors gather for state and national soccer games with carne asadas (bbqs). In the U.S., people push the control to open the garage door, maybe wave at a neighbor and then begin to hibernate inside their climate controlled cacoons. Few kids actually play outside because of the fears parents have of child abductions.

    In Mexico, family live usually in the same neighborhoods and kids play with their cousins, spend time at their aunts and uncles homes without even thinking about knocking on the door. Grandparents are a Sunday ritual where all of the family gather, meet, eat and spend the day.

    The list goes on and, well, you get the idea. It's a very warm culture and I have enjoyed my more than 30 years here in Mexico. When I enter the U.S. I feel quite alone. Hard to walk down a sidewalk without strange looks. Afterall, in the U.S., city buses and walking are considered for people of lesser means. Here I can walk down the street anytime night or day.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi George,

    Bif Marty Northeast Ohio here

    I haven't checked in for quite a while and I just thought I'd check in let you know I'm okay I'm still getting my prostate cancer treatments

    we just recently sold our smart car the little tiny cuties gone now and now we have a Honda CRV and I thought that maybe we can get a travel trailer I just wondered if that Honda CRV will pull a 16 foot scamp it's rated at 1500 pounds so that would just about be Towing the line if you know what I mean I'll be trying to look for maybe a used one somewhere anyway just saying hi to everybody that's it for now

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Marty,

      Yes! A Honda CRV should be able to easily tow a 15 foot Scamp.

      I will try emailing you.

      .

      Delete

Comments