Friday, February 10, 2017

Golf



Old Man River

8am - What does the game of Golf and the Show Boat story with the song Old Man River have to do with one another?

I do not know? But must be something! Because Old Man River has been going around inside my head lately! And...... John and George are going golfing this morning!

It's a mystery? You have any ideas? Shed some light?

13 comments:

  1. George, I gave you a moccasin recommendation on your prior post, but you have to order by Feb. 14 to get free ground shipping. Also, you need to use the promotional code I gave you for free shipping.

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    1. Hi Dee,

      By the time that I read your comment/suggestion on moccasin slippers, I had already bought a pair at Macy's!

      Thank you sooooo much for reaching out to help me!

      George


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  2. George,

    I would recommend taking plenty of extra golf balls today. Obviously you will find the water hazards today. :)

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    1. Swanny,

      I'm very sorry to let you know, that I don't understand your comment?!

      George

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    2. George - Sorry for the confusion. I should have been more clear.

      Old Man River = Water (as in water hazard)

      That's what I saw as the tie between golf and Old Man River.



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  3. George, the long dog-leg par 5s of life just keep rollin' along, and don't seem to care where your tiny little ball lands. You and I give everything all the meaning it has! The ball, too, could care less how you get to it, but a clubface square to the target line, and at the right depth ground strike, makes it go high and far, guaranteed! Fairways and greens just keep rollin' forever, so hit 'em straight, George!

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    1. Thank you sooooo much, Ray!

      George


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  4. Thanks, George, now you've got it rolling around in my head too!!!

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    1. Hi Stephen,

      For me, the lyrics to "Old Man River" have deep meaning. Because the slaves were treated, in many cases, as if they were not equal to their slave masters!

      How a slave master is able to justify what they did, I swear I do not know.

      Could there be two types of people?:
      1. Good decent people who did not participate in slave owning?
      2. Disgusting other types who owned slaves. Abused slaves.

      Terrible, terrible thing that slavery!

      George

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  5. Tennessee Ernie Ford recorded that song - haven't thought of him for years. Now that song just keeps rolling along in my head!

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    1. Sandy, I searched and searched!

      Could not find any clue that Tennessee Ernie Ford recorded "Old Man River!"

      George


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    2. Forgive my brain wave interruption, George. Tennessee Ernie Ford sang "16 Tons" and that was the song I was thinking of - how could I get so confused.....????

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  6. George, I found this on Wikipedia


    For other uses, see Old Man River.
    "Ol' Man River"
    Song
    Written 1927
    Composer(s) Jerome Kern
    Lyricist(s) Oscar Hammerstein II

    "Ol' Man River" (music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II) is a song in the 1927[1] musical Show Boat that contrasts the struggles and hardships of African Americans with the endless, uncaring flow of the Mississippi River. It is sung from the point of view of a black stevedore on a showboat,[2][3] and is the most famous song from the show. The song is meant to be performed in a slow tempo, it is sung complete once in the musical's lengthy first scene by the stevedore "Joe" who travels with the boat, and, in the stage version, is heard four more times in brief reprises. Joe serves as a sort of musical one-man Greek chorus, and the song, when reprised, comments on the action, as if saying, "This has happened, but the river keeps rolling on anyway."

    The song is notable for several aspects: the lyrical pentatonic-scale melody, the subjects of toil and social class, metaphor to the Mississippi, and as a bass solo (rare in musicals, solos for baritones or tenors being more common).

    Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra had a hit recording of the song in 1928 sung in a much faster tempo than Kern and Hammerstein intended, and featuring Bing Crosby on vocals and Bix Beiderbecke on cornet. A second version, by Paul Whiteman with bass singer Paul Robeson on vocals and sung in a dance tempo, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2006. The song is considered one of the greatest of all time,[citation needed] and in 2004, Robeson's version finished at #24 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

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