Monday, July 17, 2017

Clothing

Day 68

All The Laundry

7:38am:
Down the street from our Nite Camp, is the best coin laundry ever! Wonderful machines. Both washers and dryers. Today we are at that coin laundry. And are going to wash every single piece of clothing, towels, rags, etc. 

When I went into the coin laundry, there was a guy there sweeping the floor. This guy was wearing a kippah, worn by Jews to fulfill the requirement that the head be covered.


Me: Good morning. Are you Jewish?
Guy: Yes, I am.
Me [Speaking Hebrew]: My name is Gershon Ben Daniel. What is your name?
Guy: Joseph Ben Abrahm.

Joseph speaks Spanish, better than Hebrew. I also speak Spanish, better than Hebrew. So, we began talking in Spanish sometimes, and in English sometimes.

Almost empty closet
All the rest is now in the washing machine


9:13am:
Washing and drying is now finished. The washer did a great job.

Only $7 to wash and dry all of that! It was a lot of clothing and towels too. So much that I almost was not able to handle the weight of all that stuffed into my laundry bag!

Laundry finished!


10:03am:
Joseph shared with me about his favorite restaurants. All fish joints!
➜ Dead Fish Restaurant. Crockett, CA
➜ Soultran's Seafood, Vallejo, CA
➜ Big Wave Cafe, Manzanita, OR

Joseph Ben Abrahm


1:02pm:
We have stopped in the Town of Keizer at The Chalet for breakfast. This place appears to be a truck stop place, from the appearance as we pulled up.

We are on-the-road heading for Mohr Motors in the Capitol City of Salem, Oregon. Our salesperson Pat Carter is going to hand over Tránsito's ownership certificate.

We have changed our mind about registering Tránsito in Oregon. We were going to register in Oregon in order to save $dough$ on transfer fees. But after talking over this thing with my friend John Porter, it seemed a bit too risky. So, we are registering in California.

PS: The Chalet has really great bacon. And they make their own Marion Berry jam which is sooooo good. So much better than ANY of those plastic jam packs [Including Smucker's].

PPS: Marion Berry is a local berry. Tastes similar to black berry, but a whole lot better tasting!


1:34pm:
I just read an email from Reader David Dooley, who wrote:
"In looking back at previous blog posts, I believe that you bought items to organize Scampy at the Fred Meyer store in Salem."

WOW! If not for you, David, I'd have never known that. Coincidentally, I'm heading to Salem today!

David, I appreciate sooooo much you using your time to help me out!

6:59PM:
Would you care to view the Scampy RV Team's Battery Report?
Tránsito: 12.26 volts DC
Scampy: 12.26 volts DC

We have a question:
Why is the voltage on both batteries remaining identical?




9:01pm:
For the life of me, I do not understand the rationale of restaurants that tell customers who phone asking about closing time:
"We close at 9pm. There is no food ordering after closing."

Are those words similar to instructing phoning customers:
"We close at 9pm. Do not let our door hit you in your ass when it is 9pm!"

➜ This is exactly what happened when I phoned several area Chinese restaurants! 😖

9:53pm:
I have just left Hong Kong House Chinese Restaurant. Hong Kong House treated me with the respect that a customer deserves! Treating customers with respect is, after-all, smart business.

You may not be aware of the story of my 1976 beginning in the restaurant business [30 years after my beginning in the machine shop business]:
In 1976, I approached my wife, Evie, with my thinking of retiring from the metal goods business. I had begun in that business at the age of only 9½ years [1946] in my father's machine shop on Sunset Boulevard near downtown Los Angeles.
My early beginning in a job shop was cut short, when my task drilling 1/32" diameter holes thru 1/4" diameter beryllium copper rod was cut short. My Father would get very upset when I broke one of his drills!

My Father would tell me:
"All of those 1/32" diameter high speed steel drills that you broke are expensive! Do you think money grows on trees?"

From those years, I learned what it meant to be respectful of my Father. I also learned that just because I was promised an hourly wage, would not mean that I would actually be paid anything!

Also, I learned to use the phrase: I quit! I used that phrase to my Father when I quit his shop and took the street car back to my hone in City Terrace [Suburb of Los Angeles].

Anyway, flash-forward to 1976. I had worked myself up from an apprentice drill press operator in my Father's 1-man shop beginning in 1946 to the general manager of what my Father's shop evolved into by 1976.

My Father's shop was, "Production and Tool Engineering Company" at 589 North Mission Road, Los Angeles. That shop evolved into, Commercial Tool and Die Company at 2350 Jesse Street, Los Angeles.

[To be continued]





Nite Camp Location Map

Elevation: 426 feet




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14 comments:

  1. Funny thing, I just got a call from Apple support ! I don't own any Apple products, should I give em your number George ? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Freebird,

      Sure! Give Apple Support my phone number.

      Here it is:
      202-256-2121

      George

      .

      Delete
  2. Thanks for the article share, love checking out your blog. Always an interesting read!
    Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Phil,

      Which of Joseph's recommended restaurants are you intending to check out?

      George


      .

      Delete
  3. I haven't tried this, but they say sprinkling sugar on frying bacon really affects the flavor and that some places do that. Similar to good french fries, they too take a bit of sugar to bring out that special flavor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi LBM,

      I shall try sprinkling sugar! Sounds good!

      Hey LBM:
      Where are you now RVing in Mexico?

      George


      .

      Delete
    2. I'm home but leaving on Friday for Valle de Juarez, Jalisco with stops in Matehuala and San Miguel de Allende. We may also go to Cuitzeo, Michoacan on this trip.

      Delete
  4. George, why would a restaurant that is closed take orders they can't fill? Gotta close some time.

    ReplyDelete
  5. "Would you care to view the Scampy RV Team's Battery Report?
    ★ Tránsito: 12.26 volts DC
    ★ Scampy: 12.26 volts DC

    We have a question:
    Why is the voltage on both batteries identical?"

    Under what conditions did you perform these tests? If there were no loads on the batteries, it would indicate both batteries are only 60% charged.

    As to why they are the same? We need more information, but both at an exactly same low state of charge is probably not be a good thing. I could guess, but we don't have enough information.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Before you get into all the technical bs and mumbo-jumbo???
      Disconnect The negative and positive terminal on one battery completely,, from the other, with everything turned off on the truck an unplugged in the trailer, so there's no draw. and then take your reading
      ( You are using a multi meter is that correct )

      Delete
  6. The only "safe" way to register vehicles in Oregon is to register both your vehicle and Scampy and to have a physical address (maybe a friend's)that is not a Post Office Box. Had friends who registered their RV in OR and tow car in CA then were stopped by CHP. Not good. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  7. 6:59PM:
    Would you care to view the Scampy RV Team's Battery Report?
    ★ Tránsito: 12.26 volts DC
    ★ Scampy: 12.26 volts DC

    We have a question:
    Why is the voltage on both batteries identical?

    I'm no expert, but I would think it is caused by your battery isolater (solenoid). I have been told that when you have two batteries connected, they tend to equalize...the one with the highest charge will go down, and the one with the lowest charge will increase. Just a possibility.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  8. The answer to the question is very simple 2 batteries 3 batteries 4 batteries tied in a series equal the same voltage
    I'm guessing you're reading both batteries tied in series which would give you 12.26 V
    Take all the terminals off,, isolated,,, and you'll get four different readings
    Example: cancel the 12 and add the last two digits
    X.15
    X.11
    =.26
    If you check it with a multimeter you should come out with two different readings. two different batteries. two different kinds. and two different voltages.
    Before we are getting a shouting match here if George would take the truck an the trailer to an auto parts store and have them isolate the two batteries and do a load test on tham each
    Most load tester's today have a printed receipt compare the two
    And my second to last question is Mr, George
    In all practicality what numbers are you shooting for

    ReplyDelete

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