Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Propane

Day 161

Empty Tank!

7:54am:
This morning, I got out of bed at a little passed 6am. Inside Scampy, it was sooooo cold! 55℉! Touching our Wave3 catalytic heater to see if it was on, I found that the heater was cold!

I went outside to check our propane tank's gauge. Wow! Our propane tank was empty!

I keep a close watch on our propane tank's gauge. Last nite there was propane in the tank and the gauge was in the green. How could we have gone empty so fast?

Immediately I thought, Propane gas leak!

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Search for Propane
It took us an hour to find a place that filled propane tanks. After the propane tank was filled, I checked for leaks. No propane leak could be found.

I lit our Wave3 catalytic heater in order to begin heating Scampy. Then I made a cup of hot chocolate. The warm cup felt sooooo good to my cold hands!

Right now it is 8:20am. The temperature inside Scampy has risen to 65℉. Good temp. But still not comfortable.

BTW: A short while back, we installed a propane gas detector inside Scampy!


1:08pm:
Doing neat stuff
We have a lot of choices from our list of things-to-do:
➜ Wash Tránsito and Scampy [Both are very dirty]
➜ Build a shelf in some of Scampy's cabinets
➜ Replace clamp connectors with ring connectors on Scampy's house battery
➜ Replace the plywood board to which our Yingli solar panel is attached with aluminum angle braces

Breakfast this morning


PS: Right now, the Yingli solar panel is leading the pack for things-to-do.



6:44pm:
Green board is gone!
We began working on the Yingli Solar project around 2pm, and stopped working just as it was getting toward dusk. Things went well. It could have taken several hours more!

The Yingli is no longer attached to the ugly green plywood board. Now the Yingli is sitting inside aluminum angles and held in place temporarily by clamps.

We do not intend to drive very far like this. And will complete this project in the morning.

Our Yingli in all his glory!



9:34pm:
Dometic Catch - Latest revision
We bought a tap to change the thread in our Dometic's door catch.

How do you like it now with a thumb screw?







Nite Camp Location Map
Elevation: 69 feet





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16 comments:

  1. I'll trade you your 55 temp from my 80

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    Replies
    1. Ed,

      Where are you?

      George

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    2. Not so sunny today but warm 85 Cocoa beachFlorida

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  2. George, that tank, I believe, is only a 20-lb. tank and can be used up quite easily. Maybe the gauge is bad! Just a thought. When was the last time you filled the tank? You use this tank for heating AND cooking.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Dee,

      Propane fill-ups come around every 3-weeks.

      Usually if I see the propane pressure gaurge is low in the morning, I fill up during the day. It is unusual for the tank gauge to look OK in the morning and not last to the next morning.

      George

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  3. Watch that propane closely George. Many propane dealers have a "sniffer" that can detect small leaks and they usually do not charge to check. Soapy water on joints works but sometimes it takes longer for bubbles to form. Be careful, we do not like reading about burns!

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  4. George, if I remember right you have a propane pressure gauge that screws in between the tank and feeling, right?

    These don't measure the amount of propane in the tank because propane isn't a compressed gas.

    With a compressed gas like oxygen, nitrogen, etc. the tank pressure does drop gradually as you use the gas, so a pressure gauge will tell you how much gas is left.

    But propane is stored in liquid form with a gas bubble on top. As you draw off the gas, more liquid boils into vapor to take it's place. The tank pressure remains constant until all of the liquid propane has been used up, then it drops .I've a rock.

    That's why your propane level gauge is lying to you. It can't tell how much liquid propane is in the tank, only that there is some in there or not.

    And when the liquid propane is gone, the tank is empty because liquid propane is 270 times more dense than the vapor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lou,

      I understand what you wrote about propane pressure gauges.

      It is very unusual for me to check that gauge in the morning and believe that propane will last until the next morning. Then find out that the propane went out during that very nite!!!

      George

      PS:This is just one of those days that the gauge fooled me!

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  5. We always use a fish scale and weigh the tank. The weight capacity is stamped on the tank.

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    Replies
    1. Paul & Cindy,

      I agree. Weighing is really the best way to check the amount of propane in a tank.

      George

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  6. George, I had one of those gauges for a year or so for my propane grill. I finally gave up, it was so unreliable. Now I pour hot water over the tank and feel for the coldest part of the tank. Not perfect, but better than the gauge.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Bill,

      I'm planning on going to dual propane tanks.

      Before that decision, I was going to buy The Original Grill Gage. A hand held scale that weighs the propane tank.

      Dual tanks mean never running out of propane. I can't figure why I did not do this before?!

      George

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  7. Your Wave uses very little propane. I don't know what kind of gauge you have. Ours connects to the tank and has a glass guage with the three colors. It's never been accurate. I paid around $20 for it.

    Here in northern Mexico it is 23C during the day and this morning 9C. It was chilly to say the least. I love this weather especially if we are in the rv.

    Have you considered an electric blanket? We use ours under the fitted sheet. The heat is trapped between the blankets which allows us to use it on the lowest setting. It has never affected our battery bank. Worth checking out. Have fun!

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    Replies
    1. Hi LBDM,

      I am planning to change to dual propane tanks. That eliminates the running-out of-propane problem.

      Electric blanket? No. I like using the heater. It's comfy.

      George

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    2. George, I think there was something in your prior posts regarding twin propane tanks. If I recall, the problems were trying to find a proper set up for two tanks and the turning radius of then little Honda would put the bumper in contact with the extra tank. It has been a while, so my memory may be fuzzy on this.

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